Week 8: the world is filled with outrage

I was going to write about all the nonsense that’s been going on in the past week or two, about Paris and Mexico, Kenya and Baghdad, the poor Syrians and the frightful situation still going on in Japan (where I lived for a short while), but it seems as if even now, people are moving on to the latest outrage de jour.

Emmet Fox has something to say about all that in the 7 Day Mental Diet:

If I witness an accident or an act of injustice, instead of reacting with pity or indignation, I refuse to accept the appearance at its face value; I do anything I can to right matters, I give it right thought, and let it go at that …

For I only have one life: a limited number of years, of months, of weeks, of days, hours, minutes, seconds. How many do I have left?1505372433_f9fb36a779_m

I don’t know, which is the very point. Instead of using the finite time and energy I have on things I neither know much about or can do anything about, I must focus, just as a magnifying glass focuses the rays of the sun, on things I am good at, I can physically do, I enjoy doing, I want to do, and what fulfills my needs: the things I was born to do, that only I can do in order to make this world better.

That may or may not involve the outrage de jour; it’s likely not to. The mob always goes for the quick and easy path.

Today, I went on a walk. It was cold and clear, the autumn leaves were brilliant. We have an exercise this week in the Master Keys to go backwards in time from a physical object (a battleship) to its sources. I did that for a whole week last year, so I decided to tackle my most impressive of objects: the space habitat I will design the landscaping for. I looked up into the blue morning sky, and imagined it. How did it get there? What happens to get it up there?

It was the most amazing experience. When I came back from the growth, the plantings, the development of the soil, the forming of the areas to hold the soil in, the building of the station itself, the technologies needed to create the parts (3D printing, I think, is the way), gathering the raw materials, building a place for these constructions to happen and the people doing them to live, the backers and engineers to send these things up, rallying and finding these people, the idea, the dream.

Me, walking along a suburban street in a housing tract in central Oklahoma.Sun_through_Conifer_Leaves

I felt for the first time, today, that this really could happen. I see it. Not every little detail, but I know when it will happen. I know where I will be living, say, 20-30 years from now: there on that space habitat, when those fruit trees are grown enough so I can look up and see the sun (or whatever we set up to pass for the sun) shining down at me through their branches.

I know that I am called to make this happen. It is what I was born to do. This is the way I will fulfill my PPN of Legacy: I will matter, and pass on something which inspires people for generations to come.

You can too.

Why spend your time worrying about the outrage de jour when you can change the world?

 

 

Photo credits: Dave Gough via Flickr, Ryan Hodnett via Wikipedia

Comments (5)

  1. Jean

    You’re on the path to make it real. So beautiful to read about.

    I’ll be posting more about my battleship journey in a little while. So much fun!
    Jean recently posted…Week 8-Battleships and Future SelfMy Profile

    1. mkmma_pattyloof (Post author)

      It is fun, isn’t it? 😀

  2. Donna Wasielewski

    Love it! So true. There are SO MANY things to be upset about and we are fed these things all the time. So sad that GOOD news and inspiration doesn’t spread as fast as bad news and outrage, but I am glad we are all working together to change that!

    1. mkmma_pattyloof (Post author)

      Yes. We manifest what we think about with emotion. Imagine if the effort put into thinking about bad went into thinking about good. 🙂

  3. Robin Reves-May

    Patty this is awesome. I can feel so helpless about the tragedies of the world. Thanks for reminding to keep my perspective.

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